Tooth Loss & Smoking

All of us are aware about the consequences of smoking. Apart from affecting your oral health, this habit also effects everything else. The majority of smokers know that smoking is bad for the teeth. If you are one of them, you should learn by now that quitting this habit can both save your general health…

Effects of Smoking and Drinking on Oral Hygiene

Smoking and drinking are two of the most discussed issues in the present times. Smoking and drinking have their own ill effects. According to a recent survey, nearly 43000 Americans would be victims to oral cancer this year. 93% of these are caused because of excessive smoking and drinking. Smoking There is a very famous…

Smoking: A Danger To Healthy Gums

You’ve probably seen the warning on cigarette packages: “Quitting smoking now greatly reduces serious risks to your health.” What smoking-related diseases come to mind? Lung cancer, probably. Emphysema, maybe. But did you know that half of periodontal (gum) disease in smokers is caused by smoking? Chronic (long-term) gum disease can lead to the loss of your teeth….

Smoking and oral health

How can smoking affect my oral health? Most people are now aware that smoking is bad for their health. It can cause many different medical problems and, in some cases, fatal diseases. However, many people don’t realise the damage that smoking does to their mouth, gums and teeth.Smoking can lead to tooth staining, gum disease,…

Stop Smoking this October and improve your oral health.

Smoking can lead to tooth staining, gum disease, tooth loss and in more several cases mouth cancer. Facts about what smoking can do for your teeth: Smoking can stain your teeth due to the nicotine and tar in the tobacco, heavy smokers sometimes complain that their teeth are often brownish after years of smoking Smoking…

Smoking and Dental Health (2)

How Does Tobacco Damage Gums? Smoking has many effects on the mouth that can lead to the weakening of gums and development of periodontal disease. Smokers are 64.2 percent more likely to develop gum disease than non-smokers. More than 40 percent of all periodontal disease in the United States is attributable to smoking. The problem…

Smoking and Dental Health (1)

Everyone knows smoking causes lung cancer. It’s closely linked to cardio-pulmonary problems and can cause coughing fits and worsen asthma symptoms. And it’s common knowledge smoking can lead to emphysema and other chronic lung problems. Most people who use tobacco are aware of these risks. There’s another side effect of smoking that doesn’t get as…

5 Ways To Prevent Tooth Decay Gum Disease

Nearly all American adults experience forms of tooth decay and gum disease, most commonly in the form of cavities and gingivitis detected during routine dental visits. Cavities and gingivitis are common, and start as small concerns, but when left untreated they can quickly escalate to more severe dental disease. Despite what statistics may suggest, keeping…

Smoking and Teeth

We all have habits; some habits are good, however others are not so good and can even affect our health. If we grew up between 1960 – 1970 it was common to see and hear in tv the importance of smoking. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in the 1960 – 1970 the average…

How smoking affects your oral health? Caring for your Teeth and Gums

In addition to several other chronic diseases, tobacco use is a primary cause of many oral diseases and adverse oral conditions. For example, tobacco is a risk factor for oral cancer and periodontal disease. It can also cause stained yellow or brown teeth, bad breath, and loss of teeth. Smoking is thought to alter bacteria…

6 surprising reasons you shouldn’t overlook gum health

Consider your gums When you think of oral hygiene, do you consider your gums? “In most people’s minds, tooth brushing is focused on teeth and prevention of decay,” says dentist Robert MacGregor of Kentville, Nova Scotia. “But it’s equally important to prevent gum disease,” he says. Periodontal or gum disease is more common than you…

[Video]: 3D-printing dentists are recreating entire jaws

3D-printing has been used for basic dental procedures for years – and the technology is now advanced enough to reconstruct entire jaws. “We used to use the lost wax technique which has been around 5,000 years,” Andrew Dawood, a dentist with Dawood and Tanner, told the audience at WIRED Health. But 3D-printing has allowed him…